Guan Eng asked to step down over ongoing undersea tunnel corruption trial


lim guang

 

PETALING JAYA: In an open letter to all Democratic Action Party leaders and members of all levels, Johor DAP leader Dr Boo Cheng Hau has called on Lim Guan Eng to step down as the national chairman of the party till he is cleared of the ongoing undersea tunnel corruption trial case.

Boo said, for DAP to continue gaining the people’s confidence, its leaders should be clean and free from any corruption case.

“If by world-class democratic standards, a leader with a criminal case officer should not continue to hold the necessary office, especially the deputy chief and any scandalous person, will follow example to introduce resignation in order not to transmit wrong values to the public, and to avoid affecting the public’s public confidence of the party in the upcoming election.

“If there are any corrupt officials or other scandalous leaders in office, the true party lovers should step down and not exploit sentiments with old fashioned “political persecution”. Otherwise, how would voters see the uniqueness and communism of the party’s position?

“Any leader bogged down by corruption charges or scandals should take the initiative to resign from public office to avoid sending a wrong signal on the party’s values to the public and affecting the party’s standing in GE15.

“Personally, I think if he really loves the DAP, he (Guang Eng) should resign from the post of party chairman,” Boo said in a statement in the open letter that was posted in his Facebook today today.

He added that he is confident the national chairman would be able to make a comeback any time if he is proven innocent in court.

“If the court always proves the clearness of the party chairman, it’s not too late to resume his position. I believe the party chairman is a competent political leader who can rise again East Mountain at any time,” he said.-Malaysia World News

 


Graduate with a Master of Mass Communication. 10 years working experience in the media and broadcasting.

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